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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

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COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 

COLLEGE 

OF 
PHYSICIANS 

AND 
SURGEONS 

CLASS 

OF 

1983 




I 







■ 



DEDICATION 



This yearbook is dedicated to the Alumni Association of the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, in gratitude for its many contribu- 
tions to student life at P&S. We are grateful for the support our alumni 
have shown throughout the years — from the building of the first 
laboratory classrooms to today's summer job programs and social 
events, from its members' kindness and unfailing encouragement of 
students to their generous donations toward scholarships and the 
many activities of the P&S Club. 







President 
of 

Columbia 
University 




Michael I. Sovern, L.L.B., 
L.L.D. (hon.) 



Provost & 

Vice 

President 

for 

Health Sciences 



The past four years have taken enormous effort — most of 
it aimed at the transfer of knowledge. But this transfer is 
not an end in itself; it's an investment that you and P&S 
have made together. The pay-off will be in whatever form 
you choose. Some will choose medical practice, others 
research, and still other teaching or administration or 
another field entirely. But for all of you, it is the use you 
make of your four years of medical studies that will differ- 
entiate you, that will give you a sense of fulfillment, and 
that will bring great benefits to the communities in which 
you live. I am confident that the investment was a wise 
one; few of you will ever have an opportunity to make 
another one with such a high return. 




Robert F. Goldberger, M.D. 



Dean 
of the 
Faculty of 
Medicine 




To the Class of 1983: 

To each of you, my warmest congratulations. In the coming years we of 
the Faculty of Medicine will watch your careers as eagerly as we have 
watched your progress for the past four. Wherever fortune takes you, 
whatever your life in medicine may bring, one thing will remain unchanged; 
you will always be graduates of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, a 
fact of which I am convinced you will always be proud — just as the College 
is proud of you. I am sure your contributions to human good will be 
immeasurable and your satisfaction in making those contributions will be 
enviable. Good luck and best wishes. 

Donald F. Tapley, M.D. 

Dean 




I 





Associate 

Dean 

for 

Student Affairs 



To the Class of 1983: 

You and I have gone through four years together at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons since we each became associated with the 
Office of the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in June 1979 and 
received a packet of material for Orientation and Introduction into the 
College. 

We came recommended, according to our references, as being en- 
dowed with outstanding intellectual curiosity. In the years since our 
arrival we have expanded our fund of knowledge and grown in the 
discipline. We have sought to perform consistently at, or beyond, the 
level expected, injudgement, professional habits and attitude. We have 
endeavored to develop excellent relationships with students, faculty 
and patients. 

Your class has its own unique qualities, the most outstanding of which 
is a fine quiet intensity. Immediately on identifying a problem you very 
effectively propose a plan and solve it in a manner satisfactory to all. 
This positive, vital sensitivity has made a significant contribution to the 
campus. 

You have been patient, student, teacher, physician and surgeon. As 
you leave the Office of Student Affairs you are recommended as out- 
standing candidates to make significant contributions as students, 
teachers and Physicians and Surgeons. I wish you every success and 
happiness in your chosen fields. 

Linda L. Lewis, M.D. 

Associate Dean For Student Affairs 



President 
P&S Club 





"Yesterday is left behind and need never 
be considered again, but one who moves 
forward must always look his future in 
the eye." 



Robert J. Melfi 



President 
Class of 1983 




"Ah, if only for those early halycon days 
with one hundred and fifty idealistic 
views of our roles as physicians . . . 
protecting that image has been and will 
continue to be our most difficult 
responsibility." 



Randall H. Vagelos 



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THE EARLY HISTORY 

Of The College of Physicians and Surgeons 




Figure 1. King's College circa 1760 (Columbiana Collection, Columbia University) 



By PETER-ANDREW ALDEA 

The first medical instruction in this country was in the 
form of human dissection and was done as early as 1750 
in New York City by Drs. John Bard and Peter 
Middleton. For the most part, however, the standards of 
medical care were very poor and loose. On October 31st, 
1754, George II "by the grace of God, of Great Britain, 
France, and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, etc." 
proclaimed in a royal charter: "Know Ye, that Wee, 
considering the premises, do of our special Grace, 
Certain Knowledge, and meer motion, by these presents, 
will, Grant, Constitute, and ordain, . . ., That there be 
erected and made on the said Lands, a College, and 
other Buildings and Improvements, for the use and 
conveniency of the same, which shall be called and 
Known by the name of Kings College, for the Instruction 
and Education of Youth in the Learned Languages, and 



Liberal Arts and Sciences; ", thus, establishing King's 
College in New York City. The first active effort of 
starting medical education at King's College was by Dr. 
James Jay (John Jay's older brother). He left his practice 
and went to London, in 1763, to raise funds for this 
purpose, and succeeded in his mission sufficiently to be 
knighted by King George III. (A scandal arose, however, 
when he was unable to deliver the full sum raised, 
prompting him to delay his return to New York, and start 
a practice in London instead, which he kept until the war 
broke out.) In 1767, a group of young physicians offered 
their services to the board of governors of the college "to 
institute a medical school within this college, for 
instructing pupils in the most useful and necessary 
branches of medicine." Their offer was readily accepted 
by the board, as it was convinced that such a school "wil| 
not only (by promoting the true knowledge of medicine) 
tend to the honour and reputation of this college in 



22 




Figure 2. Samuel Bard, M.D., LL.D. 

particular, but be also a public benefit to society". Thus, 
was opened, on November 2nd. 1767, the Medical School 
of King's College, the first medical school in America, 
directly associated with an institution of "general 
learning" (Fig. 1). Its organizers and faculty were Drs. 
Samuel Clossy (Anatomy). John Jones (Surgery). Peter 
Middleton (Theory of Physic), Samuel Bard (Practice of 
Physic). James Smith (Chemistry and Materia Medica), 
and John V.B. Tennent (Midwifery) (Fig. 2). The first 
graduation was held on May 16th. 1769 in Trinity Church. 
In a ceremony that lasted over five hours the degrees of 
Bachelor of Medicine (M.B.) were conferred on Robert 
Tucker and Samuel Kissam. Subsequently, the first two 
M.D. degrees in the colonies were awarded to Robert 
Tucker, in 1770, and to Samuel Kissam in 1771. (The 
latter's graduation thesis was titled "An inaugural essay 
on the antihelmintic quality of the Phafeolus Zuratenfis 
Siliqua hirfuta, or Cow-Itch). 



For many years, there has been a controversy 
concerning the priority of awarding medical degrees 
between King's College and the College of Philadelphia 
later to become the University of Pennsylvania). 
Although the College of Medicine of Philadelphia became 
he first institution to award medical degrees when it 
warded the degree of Bachelor of Physic in 1768, it 
warded its first Doctor of Medicine degrees in June of 
1771, over a year after King's College awarded Robert 
Tucker the degree of Doctor of Medicine in May of 1770. 
VIoreover, if we are to be accurate, neither of these 
nstitutions was in reality the first to confer such a 



degree. Such distinction falls upon Yale College, which 
fifty years earlier, in 1720 honored one of its major 
benefactors, Daniel Tucker, with an honorary M.D.: 
facetiously interpreted as "Multum Donavit." 



In 1769, in his speech given at the first graduation 
ceremony of the medical school, Samuel Bard made a 
strong plea for building a public hospital in New York. 
The need for a hospital which would serve the 
community and "afford the best and only means of 
properly instructing pupils in the practice of medicine," 
prompted Samuel Bard and the rest of the faculty to 
petition and obtain, in 1771, a Royal Charter from King 
George III. authorizing the construction of The New 
York Hospital. The plans for the hospital were drawn by 



In 1767, a group of young physicians offered 

their services to the Board of Governors of the 

College "to institute a medical school within this 

college, for instructing pupils in the most useful 

and necesarv branches of medicine." 



Dr. Jones, Professor of Surgery, the same year, and the 
cornerstone was laid in 1773. But, the completion of the 
first New York public hospital suffered repeated 
setbacks. In 1776, it was damaged in a great fire and in 
the battle of New York. After new buildings were built in 
1782, it sustained damages in the Doctors' Riot of 1788, 
when a mob angered by rumours of physicians' grave 
robbing (resurrectionist) activities stormed the hospital, 
destroyed its anatomical collection and rampaged 
through doctors' offices throughout the city for four 
days. The hospital finally opened in 1791 and became 
the first teaching hospital in New York City. 



The year 1776 polarized the entire population, making 
the traditional refuge of the medical profession in 
neutrality virtually impossible. At the medical school, the 
faculty became divided into Loyalists (Bard, Clossy. and 
Middleton) and Patriots (Jones and Smith). As it was 
becoming clear the war would soon shift from Boston to 
New York, an army of 20.000 hastily mobilized, untried 
revolutionaries came to defend the city. In April 1776, 
medical studies were suspended at King's College, the 
students were dispersed, and the college was taken over 
by the Committee for Safety and then by Washington's 
troops. Despite accurately anticipating English 
intentions. General Washington was unable to hold the 
city. His losses in the brief battles of New York and Long 
Island to General Howe resulted in English domination 
of New York until 1783. 



The war, the occupation and the serious fires of 1776 
and 1778 had a devastating effect on the city, whose 
population shrank to half its pre-war size. In 1783. the 
city changed hands, the rebuilding began and the medical 



23 



void left by the war was quickly filling with physicians 
and surgeons released from military service. The war, 
however, did not bring about any remarkable changes in 
medical education. Medical education remained based 
predominantly on the apprentice system, in which a few 
students attended formal courses in addition to their 
studies in doctors' offices, and even fewer pursued 
advanced medical education abroad. A newcomer to this 
post-war New York medical scene was Dr. Nicholas 
Romayne, who was educated in Edinburgh, Paris and 
Leyden. In 1784, with the help of Samuel Bard, the 
former King's College reopened as Columbia College. 
Dr. Romayne was named both Trustee and Professor of 
the Practice of Medicine in the medical school; joining 
him on the faculty were Samuel Bard (Chemistry), 
Charles McKnight (Anatomy and Surgery), Benjamin 
Kissam (Institutes of Medicine), and Ebenezer Crosby 
(Midwifery). Unfortunately, the medical school was 
short-lived. In addition to personal differences between 
Romayne and Bard, there was considerable friction 



In April 1776, medical studies were suspended at 

King's College, the students were dispersed, and 

the College was taken over by the Committee for 

Safety and then by Washington's troops. 



concerning the practice of private instruction by 
members of the faculty. In 1787, Romayne resigned from 
the faculty to form his own medical school. Subsequent 
faculty resignations shortly thereafter effectively closed 
down the school. 



Pearl Street. In 1810, it was reported that "certain 
misunderstandings having taken place between the then 
president (Dr. Romayne) and the professors" prompted 
the Regents to investigate these differences. In 181 1 , at 
the age of sixty-nine, Samuel Bard was called from 
retirement to the presidency of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. After returning to New York in 1784, and 
reorganizing Columbia College, Bard (the former Loyalist) 
had opened a very fashionable and busy practice, 
which included George Washington (whose carbuncle 
he successfully incised, in 1789, assisted by his 
father, Dr. John Bard). Samuel Bard retired, in 1789, to 
his estate in Hyde Park, New York "to devote his leisure 
to the care of his estate and to scientific and literary 
pursuits . ' ' The year 1 8 1 1 , also saw the graduation of the 
first class (eight students) of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 



For the next few years, while the Columbia College 
Medical School had little more than maintained an 
existence, (conferring its last degree on Robert Morrel, in 
1810), the College of Physicians and Surgeons had become 
quite successful. In 1813, it moved again; this time to a 
three-story building at No. 3 Barclay Street, and in its 
eighth session (1814-1815), the class numbered 121 
students. In 1814, to allow the professors of the Columbia 
College Medical School to join the faculty of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, all the medical lectures at 
Columbia were suspended and "complete union had 
taken place." In reality, however, there was no true 
union between the two institutions. In 1860, under the 
leadership of Edward Delafield. the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons became independent of the Regents of the 
State University and became the Medical Department of 



In 1791 , Romayne petitioned the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York to recognize his 
school. However, such action by the Regents was fought 
by the trustees of Columbia College, who claimed that 
only they had the legal right to form a medical school. 
Subsequently, when the Columbia College Medical 
School proved a failure, the Regents allowed the Medical 
Society of the County of New York, in March 1807, to 
incorporate as a College of Physicians and Surgeons. The 
president of the society, Dr. Romayne, became the 
president of the College; joining him on the faculty were 
Drs. Samuel Mitchell (Chemistry), David Hosack 
(Surgery, Midwifery, Materia Medica and Botany), 
Edward Miller (Practice of Medicine), Archibald Bruce 
(Mineralogy), John Augustine Smith (Anatomy), and 
Benjamin DeWitt (Institutes of Medicine). The College 
was first located at No. 18 Park Place (formerly. 
Robinson Street). "At that time, most of the city was 
below Chambers Street. The wealthier residences were 
at the lower end of Broadway, about the Battery and 
Bowling Green, with the shops in the upper part of the 
same street. Broadway was paved only to the 
neighborhood of Canal Street beyond which it continued 
as a road. Canal Street itself existed only on paper, and 
was represented by a swamp and a sluggish stream, 
crossed by a bridge at the intersection of Broadway." 
Two years later, in 1809, the College moved to No. 553 



24 



In 1784, with the help of Samuel Bard, the 

former King's College reopened as Columbia 

College ... In 1787, Dr. Romayne, Professor of 

the Practice of Medicine, resigned from the 

faculty of the Columbia College School of 

Medicine to form his own medical school. 

Subsequent faculty resignations shortly 

thereafter effectively closed down the Columbia 

College School of Medicine. 



Columbia College. In this union, however, both 
institutions were united only in conferring the M.D. 
degrees, but remained independent of one another. A 
true union between the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons and Columbia College, was established only in 
March 1891 , when the latter surrendered its charter, 
donated all its property (valued at 1 .625 million dollars) 
to, and became an integral part of, Columbia University. 



Dr. David Hosack, Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Medicine, purchased from the city a twenty 
acre enclosure of land, which was located some three 
miles north of the city, on which he planted a great 







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Figure 3. The College of 

botanical garden. When the maintenance of the garden 
became too burdensome, he sold the property to the 
State for 74.000 dollars. The land was put into the 

ustody of the Regents, to be used in teaching Botany, 
a hich in turn put it under the direction of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons provided the garden was well 

ared for. However, the interest in Botany among the 
nedical students was low. and the College found it 
ncreasingly difficult to pay for the maintenance of the 
iarden. In 1816. after the garden fell into a state of 

isrepair. this parcel of land (encompassing the area 

etween 5th and 6th Avenues and 47th to 51st Streets 
jresently known as Rockefeller Center) was turned 

ver. by an act of the legislature, to Columbia College. 

onsequently, at present, as the owner of this land. 
Tolumbia University benefits from a very comfortable 
easing agreement with Rockefeller Center. 



In 1819. the period of tranquility ended when the 
•iedical Society of the County of New York brought 
harges of improprieties against the College of Physicians 



Physicians & Surgeons at Fourth Avenue and 23rd Street. 



In March 1807, when the Columbia College 

School of Medicine proved a failure, the 

Regents allowed the Medical Society of the 

County of New York to incorporate as the 

College of Physicians and Surgeons ... In 1811, 

at the age of sixty-nine, Samuel Bard was called 

from retirement to the presidency of the College 

of Physicians and Surgeons . . . That year also 

saw the graduation of the first class (8 students) 

of the College. 



and Surgeons to the Regents of the University of the 
State of New York. Among other charges, it maintained 
that by the professors serving as both the faculty and 
Board of Trustees of the College, they formed "a learned 
aristocracy" that could not be controlled, and which 
used the College as a source of "'exclusive privileges and 
immunities to be exercised for their sole benefit." In 



25 



Dr. David Hosack, Professor of the Theory and 

Practice of Medicine, purchased from the city a 

twenty acre enclosure of land which was located 

some three miles north of the city, on which he 

planted a great botanical garden ... In 1816, 

after the garden fell into a state of disrepair, the 

land (presently, known as Rockefeller Center) 

was turned over, by an act of the legislature, to 

Columbia College. 



addition, it was charged that the raising of lecture fees 
and the charging of additional fees by the faculty, made 
the total educational expense prohibitive. Moreover, just 
as serious was the accusation that the professional 
standards of the College were lowered, resulting in the 
hastened graduation of large numbers of unprepared 
physicians. In response, these charges were termed 
groundless, and vigorously denied by the College faculty 
which attributed them to professional jealousy. They felt 
that the teachers were, ultimately, the best judges of the 
qualifications of their students, and that the great 
increase in attendance at the college was ample proof that 
theirfees were reasonable and not burdensome. ("A 
tuition fee of fifteen dollars is charged for the full course 
of lectures, for one year, with one professor. An 
additional charge of five dollars is allowed to the 
professors of Chemistry and Anatomy for their 
assistants, and extra necessary expenses about their 
lectures"). To rectify the situation, the Regents decided 
that aside from the president and vice-president of the 
College, future vacancies on the Board of Trustees will 
only be filled by private practioners. They also fixed the 
tuition charges to a fixed rate, and set a minimal duration 
of medical studies at the College. However, no harmony 
between the two rival camps was reached with these 
changes, and their battles were moved into the College. 
In 1826, a new Regents Committee concluded these 
differences were based on "professional rivalries", and 
suggested that the composition of the Board of Trustees 
be changed. It was, therefore, decided that all the 
vacancies on the Board would be filled by "persons who 
are not of the medical profession." The College faculty 
agreed and further, demanded that the entire Board of 
Trustees be dismissed, and be replaced by nonmedical men. 
In April 1826, when it failed to convince the legislature to 
replace the entire Board of Trustees, the faculty and 
officers of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
resigned their positions, and the Regents promptly 
appointed a new faculty to take their places. To continue 
teaching, the former faculty (Drs. Hosack, Mott, 
Macneven, Mitchell and Francis), organized at their own 
expense, a rival medical school in New York, the 
short-lived Rutgers Medical College, which lasted only 
four years. 



In 1837, the College moved to No. 67 Crosby Street 
into facilities "unsurpassed by any similar establishment 



26 







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in the Union". This move began a long period of quiet 
and productive growth . In 1 84 1 . Dr. Willard Parker, 
Professor of Surgery, established the College Clinic, 
where students would observe diagnosis and treatment in 
an ambulatory care setting. From a single clinic of minor 
surgery held once a week, the clinic grew by 1876 to 
include ten different clinics (including, Pediatrics, 
Gynecology, Dermatology, Venereal Diseases, 



In 1826, after failing to convince the legislature to 

replace the entire board of trustees with 

nonmedical men, the faculty and officers of the 

College of Physicians and Surgeons resigned 

their positions, and the Regents promptly 

appointed a new faculty to take their place. 



Medicine, Neurology, and others). Indeed, the 
prominence of the College Clinics became so great, that 
in 1869, it prompted the establishment of a new grade of 
teachers, lasting to the present, named Clinical 
Professors; each of whom was in charge of his special 
clinic. In the year 1851, Bellevue Hospital joined The 
New York Hospital as a teaching institution. Thus, 
medical instruction at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, then more than ever before, covered the entire 
spectrum of disease from ambulatory care to the more 
serious and advanced conditions seen in the hospitals. 
Finally, a significant advancement in medical education 
came in 1854 with the passage by the state legislature of 
the "Anatomical Bill", which secured for medical 
schools all the unclaimed bodies from the state penal and 
charitable institutions. Prior to 1854. medical schools 
were only able to lawfully obtain for dissection the 
unclaimed bodies of convicts who died in the 
penitentiaries of Sing Sing and Auburn. Consequently, 
there was considerable dealing in bodies dug up from the 




In 1884, William H. Vanderbilt 

decided "to give substantial aid 

to the effort to create in New 

York one of the first medical 

schools in the world." In 

October 1884, he gave the 

College the deed to the land 

enclosed between Ninth and 

Tenth Avenues, and Fifty Ninth 

and Sixty Streets, with a check 

for three hundred thousand 

dollars for building expenses; In 

all, a gift of half of a million 

dollars. 

Figures 4 (opposite page), 5 (left), and 
6 (below). The College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Fifty Ninth Street. 




27 



old Potter's field cemetary. and such 
anatomical specimens could only be secured 
by uncertain, illegal and often dangerous 
nocturnal expeditions. Understandably, in 
1819, when the College moved to Barclay 
Street, "for the safety and convenience" of 
the College, an additional building, "to 
answer the purpose of a stable" and an 
entrance, were built in the rear. There is no 
doubt that this rear entrance and stable were 
built for the "safety and convenience" of 
resurrectionist expeditions in the interest of 
the Anatomy department. 

In 1856, the College moved into a four 
story brick building on 23rd street and 4th 
Avenue, where it remained for thirty-one 
years (Fig. 3). This period encompassed 
three important milestones in the history of 

Figures 7 (right), 8 (below, left), and 9 
(below, right). 





the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Two of these 
were discussed earlier; namely the 1860 agreement under 
which the College became independent of the Regents, 
and became the Medical Department of Columbia 
College, and the rapid rise in the importance and 
prominence of the College Clinics begun, in 1841, by Dr. 
Parker, with the establishment of the new teaching grade 
of Clinical Professors. Lastly, under the active leadership 
of President Edward Delafield, the Alumni Association 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons was 
established in 1859 "for promoting good feeling and 
harmony among the graduates of the College" and "to 
exercise, in a variety of ways, a beneficial influence." 



In 1884, William H. Vanderbilt decided, with the 
influence of his friend and physician, James W. McLane, 
Professor of Obstetrics, "to give substantial aid to the 
effort to create in New York one of the first medical 
schools in the world". He chose to support the College of 



28 



Physicians and Surgeons because it was "the oldest 
medical school in the state, and of equal rank with any in 
the world." In October 1884, he gave the College the 
deed to the land enclosed between 9th and 10th Avenues, 
and 59th and 60th Streets, with a check for three-hundred 
thousand dollars for building expenses; In all, a gift of 
half of a million dollars. However, W. Vanderbilt never 
lived to see his project completed; he died in December 
1885 of a massive stroke. The College building 
cornerstone was laid in April 1886, and the building was 
inaugurated in September 1887 (Figs. 4 and 5). The 
building consisted of "three connected structures; 
namely, amain building, . . . containing offices, 
museums, study and recitation rooms, professors' 
rooms, and the department of practical Anatomy (Fig. 6); 
a middle building occupying the central part of the 
grounds, in which are the main stairway hall, the lecture 
hall, the amphitheatre, and the rear stairway; and a north 
building or laboratory wing. . . . containing the janitor's 
quarters, the chemical laboratories, and the laboratories 







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The entrance to the College of Physicians and Surgeons on January 3, 

1927 



29 



of the Alumni Association" . . . "Outside . . . are the 
boiler house, and a one-story laboratory annex and nearby 
a carriage house, with rooms on the second floor for 
the accomodation of employees." Moreover, two marble 
tablets were placed in the main entrance of the building. 
The tablet placed on the west side of the vestibule listed 
the different locations of the College since its foundation, 
and the tablet placed on the east side of the vestibule bore 
the inscription "This College was chartered by the 
Regents of the University of the State of New York, 
March 12th, 1807, and was Co-instituted the Medical 
Department of Columbia College, June 6th. 1860." 
Presently, these marble tablets are located in the latest 
location of the College (Fig. 7). 



After Vanderbilt's death, his family decided to 
commemorate him and supplement his original gift. 
Guided by Dr. McLane, they founded two new 
institutions for the College. In January, 1886, less than a 
month after Vanderbilt's death, his son-in-law and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W.D. Sloane, donated the funds 
needed for the building and endowment of the Sloane 
Maternity Hospital (Fig. 8). In April 1886, Vanderbilt's 
four sons donated the funds for the building, endowment 
and subsequent, expansion of the Vanderbilt Clinic, built 
to house the very busy College Clinics (Fig. 9). 
Excavations for these buildings began in 1886, and both 
were inaugurated in December 1887. 



In 1928, the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center 
opened its doors as the world's first medical center, 
combining in a single complex complete facilities for 
patient care, medical education and research. As a fertile 
ground for investigation and clinical advancement, 
Columbia has since then occupied a position of 
leadership in world medicine. Presently, the medical 
center has a teaching staff of more than 2,000, a bed 
capacity of 1 ,500, and is served by a staff of 
approximately 950 attending physicians, a house staff 
body of 400 physicians, and close to 6,000 hospital 
employees. In retrospect, the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons has certainly come a long way since 1767, when 
a six man faculty began instructing a class of three 
students "in the most useful and necessary branches of 
medicine." 



The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center under 
construction (August 27, 1926) 



30 




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PRECLINICAL 

FACULTY 




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ANATOMY AND 
CELL BIOLOGY 




Dr. Michael Gershon 

Chairman, Dept. of Anatomy 

and Cell Biology 






Dr. Charles Ely 



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Dr. Melvin Moss 



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Dr. Frederic Agate 



Dr. Eladio Nunez 




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Dr. Ernest April 



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Dr. Karl Pfenninger 



36 




BIOCHEMISTRY 



Dr. Alvin Krasna 





Dr. Isidore Edelman 
Chairman, Dept. of Biochemistry 



Dr. Parithychery Srinivasan 




Dr. James Roberts 



37 




Dr. Allen Gold 




Dr. Richard Axel 




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HUMAN GENETICS 
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39 



MICROBIOLOGY 





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Dr. Harold Ginsberg 
Chairman, Dept. of Microbiology 




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Dr. Saul Silverstein 




Dr. Benvenuto Pernis 



40 




Dr. Bernard Erlanger 



NUTRITION 




Dr. Myron Winick 

Director, Institute of Human 

Nutrition 




Dr. Winick and Maudine 



PATHOLOGY 




Dr. Philip Duffy 
Acting Chairman, Dept. of Pathology 




Dr. Karl Perzin 




Dr. A. Whitley Branwood 



42 






Dr. Donald King 



Dr. Marianne Wolff 





Dr. Cecilia Fenoglio 



43 



PHARMACOLOGY 




X 



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Dr. Brian Hoffman 
Chairman, Dept. of Pharmacology 



FREE 

JLAR OR EXTRA-STREN 

Tylenol 



REGULAR OR EXTRA-STRENGTH 



5_ acetaminophen 



IfflB 



i, 24's Tylenol \ 



WleIoi 



$ . or 

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your local store 




Dr. J. Thomas Bigger, Jr. 



44 






Dr. Norman Kahn 



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PHYSIOLOGY 



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Dr. David Schachter 
Acting Chairman, Dept. of Physiology 








'rSSl 



Dr. John Taggart 





Dr. Mero Nocenti 





Dr. Shu Chien 



Dr. Eric Kandel 



47 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

BIOSTATISTICS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PARASITOLOGY 




Dr. Robert Weiss 
Chairman, Dept. of Public Health 




Dr. David Rush 
Epidemiology 




Dr. Joseph Fleiss 
Biostatistics 



48 




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Dr. Dickson Despommier 
Parasitology 





49 



50 



ANESTHESIOLOGY 





Dr. Henrik Bendixen 
Chairman, Dept. of Anesthesiology 



Dr. Kevin Sanborn 



DERMATOLOGY 




52 



Dr. Leonard Harber 
Chairman, Dept. of Dermatology 




Dr. Robert Walther 



INTRODUCTORY DISCOURSE, 



COURSE OF LECTURES 



THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PHYSIC 



on-. E |U iTlOXS ON THK. INDUCTIVE SYSTEM Of rROSECVTUK 
RADICAL INQUIRIES; 

A TRIBfTK TO Tin: MEMORY Or" THE LATK 

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DELIVERED 

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MEDICINE 





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NEW-YORK 




rRINTKD BV C. S. VAN WINKLE. 




No 123 Water-itreet. 




IR13; 




Dr. Robert Glickman 
Chairman, Dept. of Medicine 






Dr. Thomas Morris 



Dr. Henry Aranow 



53 





Dr. David Hosack 



Dr. Samuel Bard 




54 



Dr. Samuel Mitchell 






k 



Dr. Gerald Appel 



Dr. Glenda Garvey 




> 




Dr. John Bilezikian 



Dr. Robert Canfield 



55 





Drs. Peter Green and Jeff Stein 



Dr. Ronald Drusin 




• f>r\ 




Dr. Harold Neu 



m 



56 




Dr. Vincent Butler 





Dr. John Lindenbaum 














Dr. Qais Al-Awqati 



/ / 



Dr. Carmen Ortiz-Neu 



57 



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Dr. John Loeb 





Dr. Thomas Jacobs 



Dr. Wylie Hembree 



58 





Dr. Gerald Turino 




Dr. Andrew Frantz 



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Dr. Elliot Osserman 



Dr. Abbie Knowlton 



59 



NEUROLOGICAL 
SURGERY 




Dr. Bennett Stein 
Chairman, Dept. of Neurological Surgery 



1 



Dr. Edgar Housepian 








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Dr. W. Jost Michelsen 



60 



.. 




Dr. Peter Carmel 





Dr. Kalmon Post 



61 



NEUROLOGY 




§ 



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Dr. Lewis Rowland 
Chairman, Dept. of Neurology 








I 



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Dr. Arnold Eggers 



Dr. Richard Mayeux 




Dr. James Hammill 



62 



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Dr. Daniel Sciarra 





Dr. Carmen Vicale 





Dr. Lucien Cote 



Dr. Linda Lewis 



63 



OBSTETRICS / 
GYNECOLOGY 




Dr. Raymond Vande Wiele 
Chairman, Dept. Obstetrics/Gynecology 




Dr. Henry Frick II 



■- 



• 






- 







64 




Dr. Roy Petrie 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 
OTOLARYNGOLOGY 




Dr. Charles Campbell 
Chairman, Dept. of Ophthalmology 




Dr. Balachandran Srinivasan 





Dr. Maxwell Abramson 
Chairman, Dept. of Otolaryngology 



Dr. Soly Baredes 



65 



ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 



** 





Dr. Alexander Garcia 
Chairman, Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery 



!»^T 











Dr. Harold Dick 



Dr. S. Ashby Grantham 




Dr. David Andrews 




Dr. John Denton 




66 







PEDIATRICS 

■ 



Dr. Stephen Atwood 





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Chairman, Dept. of Pediatrics 



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Dr. Martin Nash 




67 



PSYCHIATRY 




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Dr. Sidney Malitz 

Acting Chairman, Dept. of 

Psychiatry 



Dr. Eric Marcus 




Dr. Stuart Yudofsky 




Dr. Edward Sachar 



Dr. Stan Arkow 



68 



RADIOLOGY 





CPMc 




Dr. William Seaman 



Dr. David Baker 
Chairman, Dept. of Radiology 




i 



Dr. Kent Ellis 



69 




Dr. Walter Berdon 




Dr. Sara Abramson 




fe mm i >*. 

Dr. John Austin 




70 



REHABILITATION MEDICINE 




Dr. Stanley Myers 




Dr. John Downey 
Chairman, Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine 







Dr. Erwin Gonzalez 



71 



SURGERY 








Dr. Keith Reemtsma 
Chairman, Dept. of Surgery 



Dr. Robert Bertsch 



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Dr. Thomas King 





Dr. Carl Feind 



Dr. J.B. Price 



Dr. Alfred Markowitz 





Dr. Sven Kister 



73 




Dr. Eric Rose 



Dr. Fred Bowman 



Dr. Henry Spotnitz 





Dr. Kenneth Forde 



Dr. George Todd 



74 




UROLOGY 




Dr. Peter Puchner 



Dr. Carl Olsson 
Chairman, Dept. of Urology 





Dr. John Lattimer 



Dr. Meyer Melicow 



75 



76 



SPECIAL 
PEOPLE 




77 




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GRADUATES 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 








Peter- Andrew Aldea 

Surgery 



Jose A. Alonso 

Rehabilitation Medicine 



Rolf L. Andersen 

Medicine 



82 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 



i 





Jeffrey Arliss 

Surgery 





Michael Bar 

Medicine 



83 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Syma Deborah Baran 

Obstetrics / Gynecology 



R. David Bauer 

Orthopedic Surgery 



84 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Marc Beck 

Surgery 








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Alexander C. Black 

Medicine 



Jeffrey Stuart Ben-Zvi 

Medicine 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Victoria M. Gonzalez Blizzard 

Psychiatry 




Alexander Blackwood 

Pediatrics 



Stephen Bobella 

Medicine 





4 * 



? 



Matthew K. Bonner 

Medicine 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Allyson Boyle 

Medicine 




Stephen Boos 

Pediatrics 



Thomas Patrick Boyle 

Radiology 




Scott Breidbart 

Pediatrics 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





David Alan Brill 

Medicine 




Margaret Brungraber 
Ruttenberg 

Obstetrics / Gynecology 




James Bush 

Ophthalmology 





Peter D. Cahill 

Surgery 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Victor Emanuel Camacho 

Anesthesiology 






Vicki J. Camerino 

Radiology 



89 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Patricia Camuto 
Otolaryngology 






£ 


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Richard O. Carpenter 

Pediatics 




90 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Richard Caselli 

Neurology 




Sue Ellen Carpenter 

Obstetrics / Gynecology 



Laura Chalfin 

Family Practice 




William Kuang-Yu Chen 

Medicine 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Maris Davis 

Medicine 




Peter K. Davidson 

Medicine 



Michael A. Davitz 

Pathology 





John J. Dillon 

Medicine 



92 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Michael S. Donnenberg 

Medicine 






Xavier A. Duralde 

Orthopedic Surgery 



David B. Durand 

Pathology 




Kevin Dushay 

Medicine / Pediatrics 



93 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





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Elliot M. Epner 

Medicine 




Bradford H. Eaton 

Orthopedic Surgery 



Wendy Anne Keller-Epstein 

Dermatology 





William Erly 

Family Practice 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




X ) 



V 



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Carl R. Feind 

Psychiatry 




Alan David Felix 

Psychiatry 




Joseph Fiorito 

Medicine 




Margaret E. Fisher 

Medicine 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Michael J. Flamm 

Medicine 





Christopher W. Fletcher 

Anesthesiology 





David Ira Freilich 

Medicine 



George James Florakis 

Ophthalmology 



96 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





■4 



David Paul Friedman 

Radiology 




Alan D. Gaines 

Pediatrics 





Paul Genecin 

Medicine 



David L. Garbowit 

Medicine 



97 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Aaron E. Glatt 

Medicine 




Paul R. Gliedman 

Medicine 





Neal B. Goldberg 

Surgery 




Howard Zvi Goldschmidt 

Medicine 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Michael Goldstein 

Medicine 




Yvonne Gomez-Carrion 

Obstetrics / Gynecology 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Nancy S. Green 

Pediatrics 



Thomas J. Gresalfi, Jr. 

Psychiatry 




Teddy Gutowski 

Medicine 








Walter A. Hall 

Neurosurgery 



100 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




David A. Harris 

Research 






Steven I. Hirschfeld 

Pediatrics 




Mary W. Hawke 

Medicine 



David Ingram 

Anesthesiology 



101 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Mark D. Joffe 

Pediatrics 





\ V 



Thomas H. Kalb 

Medicine 



Leon D. Jones 

Radiology 





□ 

















COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 



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James Kastelman 

Medicine 




Russel S. Kamer 

Medicine 



Robert C. Klapper 

Orthopedic Surgery 



103 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Alan Konecky 

Medicine 




Alberto I. Kriger 

Pediatrics 




V ^ x -"V"*" 



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Donald W. Landry 

Medicine 











Myla Lai-Goldman 

Pathology 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Joel S. Landzberg 

Medicine 



PI . 




V 



Seth Lederman 

Medicine 




George V. Letsou 

Surgery 




Louis S. I. in field II 
Psychiatry 



105 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





x 



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Rafael R. Lopez 

Surgery 




Neal Luppescu 

Medicine 





William W. Lytton 

Neurology 



Martin R. Lustick 

Pediatrics 



106 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 



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William T. Maloney 

Surgery 




Michael T. Macfarlane 

Surgery 



Michael Mandel 

Medicine 




John C. Manley 

Anesthesiology 




107 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Daniel Matathias 

Pediatrics 






Mary M. McCord 

Pediatrics 



108 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Robert J. Melfi 

Medicine 



Virginia S. Munro 

Psychiatry 




Gerald W. Neuberg 

Medicine 




Alexander L. Okun 

Pediatrics 




109 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1933 




Steven M. Ostrow 

Radiology 





Mark Peterson 

Radiology 



Jeffrey A. Perlmutter 

Medicine 





Richard N. Pierson III 

Surgery 



no 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Emil M. Pollak 

Medicine 





Christopher Quartararo 

Anesthesiology 



Jeffrey Pollak 

Radiology 




Thomas J. Quinn 

Anesthesiology 




in 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Ira J. Rampil 

Anesthesiology 





Anthony Demetrios Retikas 

Radiology 



Paula Ann Randolph 

Obstetrics / Gynecology 



112 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Louis Rice 

Medicine 





Wendy S. Ring 
Family Practice 



Thomas J. Rich 

Anesthesiology 




113 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




William Gary Roberts 

Medicine 





Jonathan H. Rosenthal 

Medicine 



Carolyn L. Rochester 

Medicine 





COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





■fr" 




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Adam J. Rovit 

Ophthalmology 



Andrew J. Sacks 

Anesthesiology 




Evan H. Sacks 

Ophthalmology 



115 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Gail Michele Schlesinger 

Medicine 




Barry G. Saver 

Family Practice 



Scott D. Schoifet 

Orthopedic Surgery 




116 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Michael M. Segal 

Pediatric Neurology 





Joseph Isaac Simpson 

Anesthesiology 



Matthew S. Shapiro 

Orthopedic Surgery 



117 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 






Ann E. Smith 

Otolaryngology 




Harvey E. Smires 

Surgery 



Judith W. Smith 

Surgery 








118 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 







Lawrence Robert Starin 

Surgery 




John K. Sullivan 

Emergency Medicine 





Gary Tannenbaum 

Surgery 




Louisa Thoron 

Medicine 



119 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




', 




Randall Vagelos 

Medicine 



Barbara Margaret 
Vande Wiele 

Surgery 




Paul J. Wang 

Medicine 





120 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




r 








Marcia S. Wasserman 

Medicine 




Timothy C. Wang 

Medicine 



Michael L. Weinberger 

Medicine 



121 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Martin A. Weinstock 

Medicine 




Lee Scott Weinstein 

Medicine 



Jane L. Weissman 

Medicine 





Barbara E. Whitley 

Pathology 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





James B. Wilkens 

Medicine 




Barbara Widom 

Medicine 



Philip J. Wilner 

Psychiatry 




Miriam J. Wimpfheimer 

Medicine 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 




Eric H. Winter 

Medicine 




Richard Wissler 

Pathology 





124 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

CLASS OF 1983 





Greg Yolowitz 

Anesthesiology 



■ 





Leonard T. Yu 

Surgery 



Charles Z. Zigelman 

Medicine 



125 




RKIAPPER. 



127 



BASKETBALL 




DOWNTOWN EXPRESS 




THE BLEBS 



SKIING 




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7, 





SOFTBALL 




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RUGBY 




BARD HALL PLAYERS 





THE MUSIC MAN 



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A MUSICAL COMEDY 






134 




135 




136 



CANDIDS 




137 




ADMISSIONS I 



Dear Applicant: 



ikians & Sur^P.iS of Columh : ^>v<§ 



£^y I New York, N.Y. 10032 



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630 West 168th Street 

THE CHALLENGE 
YOU'VE BEEN i/o 
LOOKING FOR! 



I am happy to inform you 
of the College of Physicians and 
1979. You have survived as arduous 
and we are pleased to have this opportunity" 
the medical profession. 



adm 



"itted to the next entering class 
to be enrolled in September of 
we have ever exper|^ led 
tudent membe 



Most of you have already completed o 
of the few who has not, you 
ent on completion of all,o 
ur transcript. We., fy 
s possible, 
s a copy of * ^_j, 
transcript by "i" 
u in our next e 




T**?* L 



THE 
TOUGHEST 



ice requi 
:his offer 
>re enrol 



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oujjill find infK* 
as well as a 



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w~?l be used 
0; 

^i,tend to 
= 4J 



WARNING: 



MEDICAL TRAINING 
'MAY BE HAZARDOUS 
TO YOUR HEALTH 




your conveme 
he date indie 



! 



:ate_ 
Ln advan 
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you . 

'the dat 

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A FRESHMAN OF THE FUTJRE.* 



APPLY NOW 




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ORIENTATION — SUMMER, 1979 





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The Life of a Red Blood Cell 




Trip to the Lungs 



Absorbing Toxic Fumes 




Phagocytes 




Foreign Bodies 



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Aging RBC 



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Trip to the Anus 




Trip to the Gonads 







Passing the Discs 



146 





FINP OUT WHAT TUf 
RfALLy LIKE 




"^iS tff PON'T MISS TH6 

PRfSCMTrD Gy T»t first yeAS ciass 





MR. BILL GOES TO AHB 



Mr. Bill used 

to be 

divergent . . . 





But not anymore!!! 




mm 









Mr. Bill asks a question in Cardiology 



You Jerk!!! Where were you during the first hour? 





Mr. Bill purchases required hematology text. 



Dr. Sluggo draws blood from Mr. Bill (OH NOOO!!!) 



148 



Mr. Bill 

ponders the 

Immunology 

directions 




Mr. Bill listens intently to Renal 




c '4,1 XA 




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Mr. Bill studies for the G.I. exam 



Mr. Bill takes the G.I. exam 





Mr. Bill enters the third year 



Camera shy: Dave G. 



149 



wm&jiii 




HEAMACHF 



WHN A BULLET! 






Hop 

THAT WAS THE YEAR THAT WAS 






l^lfl 









154 





155 




p^55oPERSTOWN 

^HOLIDAY I 








Meet the Pioneers* A\A* e J 





N€W 
G€N€RflTION 

PHYSICIANS 



IHOW T O GE T EVERYTHING YOU WANT' 







LLTHE * 
FREAKING WGY 
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2 



HAMAD GENERAL HOSPITAL1 

-IN THE CENTER 

OF HEALTH CARE FOR 

THE PEOPLE OF 



LU 
CC 



j£OCTOR 



QATAB 
ARABIAN GUI . 



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CO., 



d£ 



% 

Alcoholism, drug addiction, and suicide SkSgr 
claiming the equivalent of seven medical school 
i classes each year among physicians. 



the good life.K 



earned 



OUT THE DOOR. 




FINAL 
THOUGHT 






ADVERTISERS 



THE GOLD MEDAL RESTAURANT 



A Good Place to Eat 



Broadway at W. 169th St. 





CONGRATULATIONS TO 
THE CLASS OF '83 

from the 

HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 



161 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
CLASS OF 1983 



». ♦ 



Jl 



--»- 



• • 




Chemical Bank 

1146 St. Nicholas Ave. 

at 167th St. 

N.Y., NY 10032 



Chemical Bank 

Main Lobby, 

Presbyterian Hospital 

168th St., N.Y., NY 10032 



162 



GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION 
AT OVERLOOK HOSPITAL 



At Overlook, quality patient care has been a 
tradition for more than 75 years. Today, we 
are in the forefront of community teaching 
hospitals, with seven first-class residency 
programs: Dentistry; Diagnostic Radiology: 
Emergency Medicine; Family Practice: 
Internal Medicine; Pediatrics; and a 
Transitional First Year. 

Overlook also offers affiliated programs with 
Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in 
Surgery, Urology, and Ob-Gyn. Program 
directors are outstanding physicians, all 
Board-certified specialists in their respective 
fields. 

Here, you will enjoy the best of two worlds: 
The convenience of an attractive suburban 
setting and the advantages of an affiliation 
with the prestigious Columbia University 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

We invite you to learn more about Overlook. 
You are welcome as a junior or senior 
medical student to serve a clerkship here or, 
if you are presently selecting your residency, 
we believe that Overlook deserves your 
serious consideration. 

For more information about residency 
programs at Overlook, contact William F. 
Minogue, M.D., Vice President for Medical 
Affairs. 




Providing Quality Patient Care Since 1906 



OVERLOOK 
HOSPITAL 



Overlook Hospital 
Dept. of Medical Education 
Summit, NJ 07901 
(201)522-2085 



A major teaching affiliate of 
Columbia University 
College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 



163 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 
CLASS OF '83 



BARD HALL MANAGER AND STAFF 

BRIAN CURRIE 

MARY CARMEN WILTZ 

MARY SMITH 



164 



The Haven Coffee Shop 

Pizza & Deli Restaurant 

228 Fort Washington Avenue & 169th Street 

New York, NY 10032 

Tel. 927-6685 



And 



Reme's Restaurant 

4021 Broadway and 169th Street 

New York. NY 10032 

Tel. 923-5452 



The Management and the Personnel of these fine 
Restaurants extend our Congratulations and Best 
Wishes to All our Dear Friends of The College of 
Physicians and Surgeons of Class 1983 for a Successful 
Career and Brilliant Future. 



NELSON'S 

"FOR THE BEST PARTIES 
IN TOWN" 

We Deliver 






TEL. 928-7867 

"EVE""ANG ' 




COMO PIZZA 




PIZZA PIE. HOT & COLD HEROS 




— SODA — 


TAKE OUT ORDERS — CALL US S WE'LL HAVE ORDERS READY 




4035 BROADWAY 


YOU RING 


(NR. COR. 170TH ST.) 


WE BRING 


NEW YORK CITY 



"GOOD LUCK & BEST WISHES" 
Dave and Howie Stationers 

THE FRIENDLY SHOP 



SANFORD-HALL 
CORPORATION 

Floor Covering Distributors 
to the Trade 

20 East 33rd St. 
New York, NY 10016 
AAurry HNI4-42 17-8-9 



Congratulations to 1983! 

Take time to keep in touch with those close to 

you. 
Live, Love, Laugh, Hope and Pray. 
Refresh yourself with exercise. 
Having some measure of peace and joy you can 

better care for others. 

Anne B. Pierson, M.D. 



165 



THE DEPARTMENT OF 

SURGERY 



CONGRATULATES 
the class of 1983 



BEST WISHES 
FOR THE 
FUTURE 



166 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AND BEST WISHES 

to the class of 1983 

FROM THE FACULTY AND 

STAFF 

DEPARTMENT OF 

DERMATOLOGY 

HIGH HOPES 

for the 

CLASS of '83 



DEPARTMENT OF 
ANESTHESIOLOGY 



167 



The Department of Urology 

Wishes to Congratulate 
the Class of 1983 

and Extends Best Wishes 
for a Successful Future 



THE DEPARTMENT OF 
PEDIATRICS 



CONGRATULATES 

the class of 1 983 
for their four years of 

OUTSTANDING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 



168 



THE DEPARTMENT 

OF 

OBSTETRICS AND 

GYNECOLOGY 



EXTENDS THEIR 

WARMEST 

CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE CLASS OF 
1983 



BEST WISHES 

to the 

CLASS OF '83 

DEPARTMENT OF 
OTOLARYNGOLOGY 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the CLASS of 1983 



THE DEPARTMENT 

OF REHABILITATION 

MEDICINE 



169 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 
CLASS OF '83 



OUR BEST WISHES FOR 
YOUR FUTURE HAPPINESS 
AND CONTINUED SUCCESS 



170 



FROM THE 
DEPARTMENTS OF 



ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY 
BIOCHEMISTRY 
HUMAN GENETICS AND 
DEVELOPMENT 

MICROBIOLOGY 
PATHOLOGY 
PHARMACOLOGY 
PHYSIOLOGY 



171 



CONGRATULATIONS 

AND 

BEST WISHES FOR A 

SUCCESSFUL CAREER 



DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY 



CONGRATULATIONS 

TO THE 

CLASS OF '83 

DEPARTMENT OF 
NEUROSURGERY 



VITAL TO YOUR 
CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION 




The 

New England 
Journal of Medicine 

For over 170 years, the Journal has reported advances in 

medical science and treatment to physicians and medical 

students throughout the world. Special rates are available to 

both residents and students. 



1 440 Main Street 



Waltham, MA 02254 



172 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 

1983 
SIDNEY A. SASS ASSOCIATES, INC. 

Association Group Insurance Administrators 

for 

THE ASSOCIATION OF THE ALUMNI 
COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

747 Third Ave . New York 1 00 1 7 212-751 -4606 



CONGRATULATIONS, 
COLLEAGUES! 

The Medical Society of the State of 

New York 

420 Lakeville Road 

Lake Success, NY 11042 

(516) 488-6100 



173 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

COLLEGE 

OF 

PHYSICIANS AND 

SURGEONS 

EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS 

AND A 
WARM WELCOME 



TO OUR NEWEST MEMBERS 
THE CLASS OF 1983 



174 



GOOD LUCK TO 
THE 

CLASS OF 1983 



DEPARTMENT 

OF 
NEUROLOGY 



Congratulations Class 

of 1983 

from 

The 

Department of 

Psychiatry 




CONGRATULATIONS 

to the Class of 1983 

MORRISTOWN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

a major teaching affiliate of 
Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons 



175 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AND BEST WISHES 



from the 



DEPARTMENT OF 
MEDICINE 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS OF 1983 



DEPARTMENT OF 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 



176 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS OF 1983 



DEAN TAPLEY 

DEAN LEWIS 

AND STAFF 



177 



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SPANISHFSAIAMI 

ITAUANFSAJAMI 

PEPPERONI 

TURKEY 
HI _ 




CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 
CLASS OF 1983 

from the 

COLUMBIA CENTER DELI 




178 




Village Surgeon by comelis Dusari 
(Dutch. 1660-1704) Faraway from 
the luxury of the court and the big 
cities, life went on in rustic and 
homely ways, where the village 
surgeon generally served as 
barber, dentist, surgeon, physician 
and pharmacist. !n DusarTs 
etching of 1695, we see him 
performing a minor operation on a 
squirming peasant. In the 
background hangs a stuffed 
armadillo: such exotic animals 
often were among the stock and 
trade and the emblems of the 
apothecary. 



We at Columbia Medical Center Bookstore 
extend our congratulations to the members of 
the class of 1983. We also hope that our books 
will help you build a firm foundation for your 
future careers. Come into our store and let's get 
acquainted. We will do our best to help make 
the transition through your medical education 
as smooth as possible. 



The Columbia University 

Medical Center ^g^| Bookstore 

Medical Center 650 W. 168 Street Nev\ York 10032 Tel (212) 694-4044 



Services: An extensive selection of the 
most current medical textbooks, stationery, micro- 
scopes and our text buyback service are only some of 
the ways we try to make the coming years a little easier 
for you. 



179 



PARENT'S FUNDRAISING 
CAMPAIGN 

The Yearbook Committee of the Class of 1983 wishes to thank the 

following parents for their generous contributions to the 1983 P&S 

Yearbook Parent's Fundraising Campaign: 

BENEFACTORS 

Doctors Adrian & Blanche Aldea 

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Beck 

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Brill 

George Cahill 
Richard G. Eaton, M.D. 

Carl & Helen Feind 

Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Felix 

Mr. & Mrs. George Flamm 

Harold & Blanche Friedman 

Allan Hall, M.D. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joel D. Hawke 

Mr. & Mrs. Morton Kalb 

Mr. & Mrs. Eduardo Kriger 

Mr. & Mrs. Sol Landzberg 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Lederman 

Harvey & Elaine Luppescu 

Mr. & Mrs. William F. Maloney 

Anne B. Pierson, M.D. 

The Rice Family 

Rita & Bruce Roberts 

Dr. & Mrs. Samuel Wang 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry Wilner 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Weinstein 



180 



PARENT'S FUNDRAISING 
CAMPAIGN 



PATRONS 

Dr. & Mrs. Felix Wimpfheimer 

SPONSORS 

Ralph & Edith Bar 

Mrs. Josephine Carrion 

Mrs. William V. Dillon 

Seymour & Hannah Dushay 

Melvin Goldberg 

Ilona Hirschfeld 

Sidney M. Lytton 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert V. Melfi 

Richard N. Pierson. Jr., M.D. 

Dr. &Mrs. Emil M. Pollak 

Mr. & Mrs. James W. Randolph 

Edward Sacks 

Joseph Tannenbaum 

Dr. & Mrs. P. Roy Vagelos 

Dr. & Mrs. Bertram J. Weissman 

Gerald S. Weinberger, M.D. 



DONORS 

Doctors George & Mary Stuart Fisher 

Herman Gaines 

Monroe D. Green 

Joseph & Regina Gutowski 

Donald O. Rich 
Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Shapiro 

Manny Wasserman 

Mr. & Mrs. Irvin Weinstock 

A. Tobey Yu 



181 



THE YEARBOOK COMMITTEE 




EDITORS 
Robert J. Melfi 
Philip J. Wilner 



At first a fleeting thought, now a lasting reflec- 
tion of pleasant memories we somehow 
managed to take with us. We hope everyone will 
find this book a fitting tribute to their years at 
P&S. 



We would like to express our thanks to the following people, without whom this yearbook would not 
have been possible: 

— The Alumni Association for their continuing financial support and for funding the purchase of the 
dye used to emboss the cover of this yearbook and of those to follow 

— The Faculty, for their generous emotional and financial support 

— Those parents who contributed to our Parent's Fundraising Campaign 

— Barbara Howells, P&S Club Administrative Aide 

— Mae Rudolph and the Public Relations Office 

— Joe Donovan and the Hunter Publishing Company 

— Ed Thornton, our Class Photographer 

— Our sponsors, for advertising in our book 

and special thanks to Steven Gerst for lending us his very special talents. 



182 



THE 1983 

YEARBOOK 

COMMITTEE 




Peter Aldea 
Robert Basner 
Kevin Dushay 
Yvonne Gomez-Carrion 
Alberto Kriger 
Joel Landzberg 
Jeff Perlmutter 

Emil Pollak 
Paula Randolph 

Matt Shapiro 

Larry Starin 
Gary Tannenbaum 

ART 

Robert Klapper 
Harvey Smires 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Jeffrey Ben-Zvi 

Vicki Camerino 

Yvonne Gomez-Carrion 

Lee Jones 

Joel Landzberg 

Paula Randolph 

Carly Rochester 

Gail Schlesinger 

Matt Shapiro 





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